Auckland, New Zealand

Distance: 30 miles
Time on bike: 0.75 hours

Officially our last day of the bike trip and we leave at 9.30 am for the ride down to the warehouse located on the southern side of Auckland to drop the bikes off for shipping back to the UK.

On the way we drop off the maps that we’d borrowed from one of Béné’s friends and then call into a shop to get packaging tape and some fluffy blankets to act as protection for the bikes when in the crates.

There’s a big sense of relief arriving at the warehouse; the bikes have made it through everything and we quickly set to work getting them crated and ready for shipping. We’re using the same company that helped us clear the bikes in New Zealand and they’ve been very kind to hang onto the same crates we used when bring the bikes in from Australia. Another sense of relief is that we’ve made it here in one piece, which was always something we were very conscious of throughout the trip.

Although this is the fourth time on the trip that we’re freighting the bikes, it still takes us a few hours to get finished. Getting the bikes on the crates is the easy part, but trying to arrange all the luggage in such a way that it won’t move around or cause damage to the bikes is a bit of a puzzle. We’re still absolutely shattered from the day of cleaning the bikes yesterday so by the end we’re exhausted.

There are only a few papers to sort out for shipping and we should have the carnets back tomorrow after being stamped by customs. It’s not long before we walk out of the warehouse, again bikeless and feeling a bit lost. We’re really lucky that Brian can pick us up and we all head back to the North Shore where we can relax for the rest of the day.

And that’s it. We fly back to England on Monday direct from Auckland; we’d thought about places we could visit along the way but without the bikes it just wouldn’t be the same. They’ve been a great way of seeing the countries we’ve travelled through on our journey from England to New Zealand and we’re really pleased with achievement of having been able to complete the trip.

We’ve been able to keep quite a detailed log of our journey along the way and have taken 17,540 photos of which 6,655 are uploaded onto the website. A huge thanks to Wayne for putting the website together and helping us to log the entire trip.

There are also 545 video clips to edit through with the aim of producing a DVD to help summarise the trip and give us something to look back on. If it’s any good we’ll make some copies available and send them to the people who’ve helped us along the way.

The trip log, which started out as a quick journal of events in the early days, then continued as a daily record of what we’d been up to, the places we’d visited, the people we’ve met and the experiences we’ve gained – this now stands at nearly 300,000 words and whilst at times has been a bit of a chore to do, it certainly has given us a detailed account of what we’ve spent the last 14 months doing – it feels like we’ve been away from home for more like five years.

So what are the statistics for the trip? Here’s a quick summary of what we’ve been up to since setting off on our journey on Monday 19 April 2010.

The total distance covered by the bikes was 37,527 miles (although the actual distance covered according to the GPS log is 36,101 miles), during which we passed through 24 countries, using 20 different currencies and coming across 17 different languages. Russia was certainly the most difficult, but after three months in Russian speaking countries we’d picked up enough of the language to order food, arrange accommodation and fill the bikes with petrol quite fluently.

Out of the 423 days away we spent 272 of those travelling on the bikes averaging 138 miles per day and a total of 998.75 hours of riding, an average of 3.67 hours per day. Aside from Russia and Australia, it never felt like we were covering any huge distances on the bikes each day; mainly because we were often stopping to see places.

We stopped to fill the bikes 175 times with petrol; Carl used 1,995 litres of petrol averaging 86 miles per gallon and Béné used 2,040 litres averaging 84 miles per gallon. At their most efficient the bikes were returning over 100 mpg, which was typically on hotter days such as in Europe and Australia (possibly attributed to fuel expansion in the tank?) and on alpine roads which the bikes seem to thrive on. The longest distance covered before the fuel light came on was 262 miles, which isn’t bad for a 17 litre tank.

The total petrol cost for the whole trip for two bikes was £3,512 which is average of 88p a litre, or 5p per mile per bike. The cheapest petrol was in Malaysia at 38 p per litre and the most expensive was of course in the UK, followed by Europe, NZ (£1.11/litre) and then Australia (£1/litre). From Ukraine and for most of the journey through Asia, petrol was cheaper than water.

For all our transport costs which includes all ferries, flights and shipping for getting all the way down to NZ and back to the UK amounted to £3,800 each. This includes transporting the bikes by air over Burma, shipping from Singapore to Darwin, shipping from Brisbane to Auckland and shipping from NZ back to England.

For accommodation, we’ve stayed in 260 different places and managed to secure a free night 76 times on the trip; 19 being wild camping with the others being with family and friends to whom we’re extremely grateful to for their hospitality as it meant a great deal to us. We used the tent a total of 107 times on the trip, so the kit was certainly worth carrying and for us felt like a home from home. Quite a few travellers we met seemed to remain planted in the same place for days, weeks or even months on end; but we wanted to see as much as possible during our time away so it was unusual for us to spend more than a couple of nights in the same place.

For the bikes, we’ve paid £2,500 over the course of the trip on spare parts or repairs and these are summarised below;

Bike Repairs and Maintenance
Carl Front tyre replaced in France and Adelaide, averaging 20,000 miles each. Front puncture after tyre change in Adelaide, but fixed easy with a patch while at the campsite.
Rear tyre replaced in France, Almaty, Boolarra (part used tyre) and Queenstown, averaging 16,000 miles each. Premature failure of tyre in Almaty at 8,000 miles possibly caused by hot tarmac conditions through Russia – tread started falling off, Metzeler not interested in hearing about problem. Rear inner tube valve also failed at same time, but could have been symptomatic of tyre failure when riding with low pressure while looking for a new tyre.
Rear puncture fixed in Thailand with help of local garage vice to break tyre bead.
Water pump plastic drive cogs failed in Hungary, but was expected to happen and spare parts were being carried and fitted the same day. Water pump seal kit also replaced while engine apart.
Small oil leak from clutch cover fixed in Almaty with gasket sealant.
Oil and filter replaced in France, Almaty, Malaysia and Auckland, usually about 8,000 mile periods.
Fraying clutch cable replaced in Almaty with spare being carried.
Cooling fan motor seized in Almaty and replaced with motor and fan assembly from a Mitsubishi turbo intercooler. Superb repair job and done with incredible skill – thanks Baka.
Front and rear brake pads replaced and calipers removed, pistons cleaned and sliders greased periodically.
HD DID Chain and BMW sprockets fitted in France, still going strong and now have 30,000 miles on. For lube used ATF almost daily, or every 200 miles, or 50 miles if riding in wet conditions.
Steering head bearings re-greased in France, replaced in Malaysia and re-greased in Auckland.
Rear suspension linkage bearings re-greased in France and Boolarra, no parts replaced.
Water pump seal kit replaced in Malaysia due to small oil leak caused by carbonised oil on impeller shaft.
Water pump seal kit replaced in Adelaide, ‘possibly’ as a result of inserting seals the wrong way around in Malaysia.
BMW paper air filter replaced in France and Malaysia, but occasionally removed and tapped clean of dust and debris, especially when clearing quarantine for Australia and NZ.
Chain guard fixed numerous times due to impact from pannier rack and vibrations. Pannier rack modified in Lahore, Pakistan to avoid contact problems.
Pannier rack ‘door hinge’ mounting bracket replaced in Kashgar, China by welder and another replaced in Gilgit, Pakistan.
Headlight mounting brackets fixed in Almaty – thanks again Baka.
Current Bike Condition Generally good for being nearly six years old with 88,350 miles on the clock. The paint is flaking from the engine, but this is common with these bikes; rear suspension linkage bearings are just showing minor signs of play, seat cover is cracking in places due to UV degradation (not riders arse); steering head bearings need re-greasing and fork oil needs replacing; neoprene fork gaiters are fine but could be replaced and meant the fork seals are still in great shape. Otherwise, she’s tip top with everything original including the clutch, brake fluid and fork seals.
Béné Front tyre replaced in France and Adelaide, averaging 20,000 miles each.
Rear tyre replaced in France, Almaty, and Port Macquarie, averaging 16,000 miles each. Premature failure of tyre in Almaty at 8,000 miles possibly caused by hot tarmac conditions through Russia.
Front puncture fixed in Kyrgyzstan with help of local puncture repair workshop.
Oil and filter replaced in France, Almaty, Malaysia and Auckland, usually about 8,000 mile periods.
Fraying clutch cable replaced in Kanchanaburi, Thailand with spare being carried.
Front and rear brake pads replaced and calipers removed, pistons cleaned and sliders greased periodically.
HD DID Chain and BMW sprockets fitted in France, still going strong and now have 30,000 miles on. For lube used ATF almost daily, or every 200 miles, or 50 miles if riding in wet conditions.
Steering head bearings re-greased in France, replaced in Malaysia and re-greased in Auckland.
Rear suspension linkage bearings re-greased in France but a nasty knocking noise while riding through Kazakhstan turns out to be a badly worn bearing case and replaced with assistance from local motorbike club in Almaty. Bush badly scored, but no replacement parts available. Suspension works fine and manages to get to Australia where all bearings and the bush replaced in Boolarra.
Water pump seal kit replaced in Malaysia due to small oil leak caused by carbonised oil on impeller shaft.
Water pump seal kit replaced at Ayers Rock, ‘possibly’ as a result of inserting seals the wrong way around in Malaysia.
K&N air filter occasionally removed and tapped clean of dust and debris, especially when clearing quarantine for Australia and NZ.
Bike frame snapped where pannier mounts in a fall in the Ural Mountains, Russia. This also cracked the fairing and broke the indicator. Tape and straps get us to Kazakhstan where the frame is welded in Kokshetay.

Side stand mount snapped off frame when attempting to break the bead on Carl’s tyre when in Kanchanburi, Thailand. Managed to get this welded back on at a local garage. This repair also included hot-wiring the side stand switch as it was smashed and also straightening the exhaust which was bent. Side stand switch eventually replaced in Australia.

Pannier frame mount snaps in Australia and is fixed with assistance of a Holden body repair workshop welder.

Bolt attaching the front of the subframe to the main frame snapped in NZ; temporary replacement used until long enough bolt could be sourced.
Headlight mounting brackets fixed in Almaty – thanks Baka.
Current Bike Condition Generally good for being nearly seven years old with over 90,000 miles on the clock. The paint is flaking from the engine, but this is common with these bikes; steering head bearings need re-greasing and fork oil needs replacing; fork gaiters are fine and meant the fork seals are still in great shape. Small leak from rear brake servo, but just needs a small part replacing. Otherwise, she’s tip top with everything original including the clutch, brake fluid and fork seals. A little maintenance and care saves a lot of time and cash in the long term. Amazingly, not one repair caused us to be delayed during the trip.

So what were the highs – certainly travelling through Kyrgyzstan, China and especially Pakistan were right up there because of the breath-taking scenery, the remoteness and ruggedness of the environment but most of all because of the people that we met. Being invited into a yurt in the middle of Kyrgyzstan, miles from any civilisation and having dinner with four generations of a family all living together, the eldest being 92 years old, is just an example of one of the special moments we were lucky enough to enjoy.

The life of many people we met seems much less complicated without the wants of a modern world and yet this doesn’t mean their quality of life seemed any less because of this; if anything they seem to enjoy a life that people who are used to commuting, sitting in an office and paying the bills are so far away from.

We’ll always be indebted to Baka and his family in Almaty, where our bikes decided to have most of their problems occur, thankfully just before we left to travel through some of the most difficult terrain on the trip, and the furthest from any access to spare parts. They showed us incredible hospitality and ensured we could get the bikes fixed, even when the correct parts aren’t available. This is epitomised with the Mitsubishi intercooler motor fan now attached to Carl’s radiator. Their help even extended to dentistry, when Béné lost a crown in one of her teeth while having dinner with them. Kazakhstan was a country that really surprised us and had an incredible feeling of optimism, good will and a drive to prosper.

In Nepal, we really enjoyed seeing the parts of the country in-between where all the tourists head, but we loved our three weeks off the bikes trekking through the mountains and rafting down the Kaligandaki River.

Once our journey reached Thailand, much of the challenge started to reduce as we had fairly easy access to parts and the roads and driving style was much more relaxed. The food wasn’t bad either. This feeling of challenge almost lost us completely when we arrived in Australia and New Zealand, the first countries since leaving England where we could walk into a shop and for once understand everything that was available. There was no language or cultural barrier at all and the trip began to feel more like a typical bike holiday in Europe, but we still strove to pack as much in and see as much of the place as possible.

Something that many people want to know is how much did it cost. Well, in summary for absolutely everything including accommodation, food, petrol, parts, repairs, flights, bike transport, all the museums, trips and activities such as rafting, scuba diving, sky diving etc, amounted to £43 a day each, or £300 a week.

We feel very proud of what we’ve done and hope that it gives others the inspiration to do something similar. We didn’t have any sponsorship, support vehicles, language assistants or fixers; just ourselves to deal with all the planning and anything and everything that came up and this made the whole experience absolutely fantastic.

We’ve learned a great deal on the trip, helped mostly by being driven to see and experience as much as possible in the countries we’ve travelled through. A major concern was always what would happen if one of the bikes broke down, but it was these events that we’ll always look back upon with great memories as it was these moments that put us into contact with some amazing people.

The biggest downside with being away for so long is to be away from friends and family, but a major highlight for Carl was to get to Boolarra in Australia where his Uncle, Aunt and their family live. Arriving in a town that for twenty five years had just been a name on a map on the other side of the World, riding the same bike used for commuting to work on for the previous three years in London, was one of the defining moments for Carl; so thank you Tony and Linda and hopefully we’ll make it back across before too long.

We’re now back in England and waiting for the bikes to arrive on the ship from New Zealand. We’ve gained a wealth of knowledge and would be happy to answer questions from anyone about our trip. We don’t profess to know everything, but what we’ve learned would make doing a similar trip much easier for us.

Thanks to everyone that commented on the website and enjoyed following the trip.

A la prochaine.

Carl & Béné

Jour 423 – Mercredi 15 Juin 2011. Auckland, Nouvelle-Zélande.

Distance: 48 km– Temps à moto: 0.75 heures

C’est officiellement le dernier jour de notre grand voyage à moto aujourd’hui. Et on se réveille assez tôt, un peu anxieux, pourvu que tout se passe bien aujourd’hui. On monte sur les motos à 9h30 pour aller vers l’agence de cargo. En route, on passe déposer les cartes de Nouvelle-Zélande qu’on avait empruntées à une copine de Delphine, et on passe dans un magasin où on achète deux couvertures pas chères pour essayer de protéger les motos lors de leurs boites.

On est bien contents d’arriver à l’agence de cargo sans problème, notre voyage est fini : de Royston en Angleterre jusqu’à Auckland en Nouvelle-Zélande à moto, quel voyage, quelle expérience ! Carl se sent aussi un peu soulagé d’arriver ici sans accident, c’est une chose qui l’inquiétait un peu pendant ce voyage. Enfin, on n’a pas le temps de trop y penser, on doit quand même emballer les motos, et on espère les récupérer en Angleterre d’ici un peu plus d’un mois.

On nous laisse un coin du hangar avec les deux caisses qu’ils ont gardé pour nous depuis notre arrivée il y a presque 3 mois, et on passe quelques heures à les emballer. Ça se passe assez bien, même si on est vraiment fatigues et que même Carl est complètement crevé à la fin. C’est la quatrième fois qu’on met les motos en boite, mais on a toujours du mal à sécuriser les sacoches autours des motos, on ne veut pas qu’elles frottent ou qu’elles s’abîment.

Une fois qu’on a fini, on passe dans le bureau voir Simone qui est la personne qui s’occupe de toute l’organisation du cargo, on signe quelques papiers, puis on sort dans la rue où on attend Brian qui vient nous chercher pour nous ramener chez lui. On prend l’avion Lundi midi pour rentrer en Angleterre. Ça nous semble vraiment étrange d’être à la fin de ce superbe long voyage, et on est bien contents de rentrer voir nos amis et familles, d’autant plus qu’on a tous les deux la chance d’avoir un boulot qu’on va pouvoir retrouver début septembre. On pense vraiment avoir eu de la chance de faire un tel voyage.

Durant ces 14 mois de voyage, nous avons pris de nombreuses photos et petits films avec lesquels nous pensons faire un DVD quand on sera de retours chez nous. Notre journal, qui est bien plus détaillé que ce qu’on pensait faire, et qui a pris pas mal de temps à écrire, nous rappellera tous les détails de notre expédition dans le futur, et nous avons vraiment l’impression d’être sur la route bien plus longtemps que 14 mois.

Voila un résumé de statistiques de notre voyage qu’on a pu faire grâce à toutes les notes qu’on a prises:

Nous avons pris 17540 photos, et en avons mis 6655 sur le site, nous avons 545 clips vidéo que nous allons utiliser pour faire un petit film.

Nous avons fait un journal détaillé de chaque jour, ça n’a pas été facile à faire tout le temps comme ça prenait pas mal de temps, surtout comme on a écrit le journal en deux langues.

Pendant les 14 mois passés, depuis le 19 Avril 2010, nous avons eu l’impression d’être partis pendant 5 ans comme on a fait tellement de choses.

La distance totale que nous avons parcourue est de 37 527 miles, ça fait 60 118 kilomètres. Nous sommes passés dans 24 pays, qui avaient 20 différentes monnaies, et 17 langues différentes. La partie la plus dure pour nous était la Russie, car l’anglais, le français et l’espagnol y étaient inutiles, nous avons donc appris au plus vite quelques mots pour nous permettre de comprendre un minimum, et de commander à manger, à boire et de faire le plein.

Sur 423 jours de voyage, on a passé 272 jours à moto en faisant une moyenne de 221 kilomètres par jour, et nous avons passé 998,75 heures en route, ce qui est en moyenne 3,67 heures par jour.

Nous avons fait le plein 175 fois, Carl a utilisé 1995 litres d’essence Béné en a utilisé 2040, ce qui fait une moyenne de 3,32 litres au 100 pour Carl et 3,39 litres au 100 pour Béné. Et les motos ont consommé le moins d’essence quand il faisait le plus chaud ou sur les routes de montagnes, en Europe et en Australie.

Le coût total d’essence sur tout le voyage est de £3512, ce qui fait à peu près 3933 euros, avec un prix d’une moyenne de 98 centimes par litre.

Les coûts de transport, c’est-à-dire les vols, ferries et transport de motos par avion et cargo du Népal a la Thaïlande, de Singapour a Darwin en Australie (en passant par Bali), de Brisbane en Australie à Auckland en Nouvelle-Zélande, puis d’Auckland en Angleterre, le tout nous est revenu à £3800 chacun, c’est à peu près 3400 euros.

Point de vue logement, nous sommes restés dans 260 endroits différents et nous avons campé 107 fois et avons eu 76 nuits gratuites grâce au camping sauvage (19 nuits), et à la générosité de nos familles, amis et de gens que nous avons rencontré en chemin, merci beaucoup à tous !

Nous avons dépensé £2500 pour des pièces de rechanges et autres frais de réparations.

Pour ce qui est des réparations, voilà ce que nous avons fait :

Sur la moto de Carl :

- le pneu avant a été changé en France et en Australie. Ils ont fait 20000 miles chacun. Il a eu une crevaison en Australie lors du changement de pneu, et nous l’avons réparée au camping.

- le pneu arrière a été changé en France, au Kazakhstan et en Australie. Ils ont fait en moyenne 16000 miles chacun. Le problème de pneu au Kazakhstan a pu être causé par la chaleur des routes pendant la vague de chaleur en Russie. Crevaison  en Thaïlande réparée par un garage local.

- La pompe de liquide de refroidissement : les pignons on été changés en Hongrie et on a remplacé les joints en même temps. Une petite fuite d’huile que nous avons réparée au Kazakhstan. Joints de la pompe remplacés en Malaisie suite a une petite fuite, puis a nouveau en Australie (nous les avions peut-être mis a l’envers en Malaisie).

- Changement d’huile et de filtre : en France, au Kazakhstan, en Malaisie et en Australie, a un intervalle d’environs 8000 miles.

- Câble d’embrayage : changé au Kazakhstan comme il était abîmé.

- ventilateur : le moteur du ventilateur a fondu à Almaty, au Kazakhstan, et il a été remplacé par un ‘Mitsubishi turbo intercooler’ par Baka qui est un mécano incroyable ! Merci Baka !

- les plaquettes de freins avant et arrière remplacés une fois, et nettoyés régulièrement.

- Chaine HD DID et pignons BMW mis en place en France, ils sont encore en bon état après 30000 miles. Entretien régulier de la chaîne avec du liquide ATF : tous les jours, où tous les 300km par temps sec, et tous les 50km par temps de pluie.

- Roulements de direction : graissés en France, puis en Australie.

- Roulements de suspension arrière re-graissés en France et en Australie.

- Filtre à air BMW en papier remplacé en France et en Malaisie.

- Garde boue de la chaîne: réparé plein de fois à cause du cadre des sacoches et des vibrations.

- Montant du phare avant : réparé au Kazakhstan – Merci encore Baka !

Etat général de la moto : 88350 miles, elle est en assez bon état, la peinture s’écaille un peu sur le moteur, mais c’est courent sur ces motos. Il y a un peu de jeu du roulement de roue arrière ; la couverture du siège est craquelée (Carl dit que c’est à cause du soleil pas du motard !) ; l’huile des fourches est à remplacer et les roulements sont à re-graisser.

Sur la moto de Béné :

- le pneu avant a été changé en France et en Australie. Ils ont fait 20000 miles chacun. Crevaison au Kirghizstan, réparée dans un petit garage.

- le pneu arrière a été changé en France, au Kazakhstan et en Australie. Ils ont fait en moyenne 16000 miles chacun.

- La pompe de liquide de refroidissement : Joints de la pompe remplacés en Malaisie, puis a nouveau en Australie (nous les avions peut-être mis a l’envers en Malaisie).

- Changement d’huile et de filtre : en France, au Kazakhstan, en Malaisie et en Australie, a un intervalle d’environs 8000 miles.

- Câble d’embrayage : changé en Thaïlande comme il était abîmé.

- les plaquettes de freins avant et arrière remplacés une fois, et nettoyés régulièrement.

- Chaîne HD DID et pignons BMW mis en place en France, ils sont encore en bon état après 30000 miles. Entretien régulier de la chaîne avec du liquide ATF : tous les jours, ou tous les 300km par temps sec, et tous les 50km par temps de pluie.

- Roulements de direction : changés et graissés en France, puis graissés en Australie.

- Roulements de suspension arrière re-graissés en France, changés au Kazakhstan par nos amis du club de motards d’Almaty avec les roulements de la taille la plus proche, puis remplacés par les roulements BMW en Australie.

- Filtre a air nettoyé à Singapour.

- Garde boue de la chaîne: réparé plein de fois a cause du cadre des sacoches et des vibrations.

- Montant du phare avant : réparé au Kazakhstan – Merci encore Baka !

- Soudures : le cadre de la moto a été ressoudé au Kazakhstan là où les sacoches sont attachées suite a une chute dans la boue ; la béquille a été ressoudée en Thaïlande quand on l’a cassée en essayant de l’utiliser pour réparer la crevaison a Carl (on a aussi dû court-circuiter le détecteur de la béquille en attendant de le remplacer comme il a été écrasé en même temps) ; et une autre partie du cadre de soutien des sacoches qui a cassé après avoir été tordu plusieurs fois (réparation gratuite par un super garage en Australie).

- Boulon de fixation des sacoches : remplacé pour renforcer la position de la sacoche comme avec l’usure il était complètement tortu et usé.

Etat général de la moto : a plus de 7 ans et avec plus de 90000 miles, elle est en assez bon état, la peinture s’écaille un peu sur le moteur, mais c’est courent sur ces motos; l’huile des fourches est à remplacer et des roulements sont a remplacer. Le liquide de freins est à remplacer.

Nous avons eu beaucoup de chance et aucune de nos réparations ne nous ont retardé, et nos pannes nous ont permis de rencontrer et de passer du temps avec des gens super sympas.

Quels sont nos meilleurs souvenirs ?

Certainement la traversée du Kirghizstan, de la Chine et du Pakistan les paysages spectaculaires, leur isolation et des gens que nous y avons rencontré.

Être invités dans une yourte au milieu du Kirghizstan, loin de tout par une famille qui a voulu partager avec nous leur repas, c’est juste un exemple de moments de bonheur tout simples que nous avons eu la chance de vivre.

La vie de gens que nous avons rencontrés qui est bien moins compliquée et plus heureuse que celle de nos vies tellement pressées et stressées dans ce qu’on appelle les pays développés.

Nous sommes particulièrement reconnaissants à Baka et sa famille qui nous a accueillis à bras ouverts au Kazakhstan, à Almaty, quand nos motos ont soudain décidé d’avoir un problème après l’autre, juste avant d’aller sur les routes les plus isolées de notre voyage. Ils nous ont accueillis, ils ont tout fait pour nous aider à reprendre la route, y compris remplacer le radiateur de la moto a Carl par un radiateur bien meilleur, et trouver un dentiste pour dépanner Béné dont une couronne est tombée lors d’un repas ! Nous avions déjà eu l’impression que le Kazakhstan est un pays jeune qui a un potentiel énorme, mais leur accueil était vraiment incroyable.

Nous avons aussi beaucoup apprécié le Népal, la partie peu touristique autant que notre grande randonnée et nos 3 jours de raft sur la rivière Kaligandaki.

Une fois que nous sommes arrivés en Thaïlande, les choses sont devenues plus faciles, les routes étant en meilleur état, la circulation bien plus calme et organisée. Et une fois en Australie et Nouvelle-Zélande, c’était vraiment du tourisme facile, plus de difficultés à se faire comprendre ou à trouver quoi que ce soit là-bas !

Quant à la nourriture, nous n’avons jamais eu de mal à en trouver, les choses les plus originales que nous ayons goûtées sont le lait de cheval fermenté et le lait de chameau ; puis en Asie, tout était vraiment délicieux !

La chose qu’on nous demande souvent est le coût de notre voyage, et tout compris, ça nous a coûté £43 par jour, c’est-à-dire environs £300 par semaine.

Nous sommes très fiers de ce que nous avons fait et espérons que nos récits et photos peuvent inspirer d’autres gens à en faire autant. Nous n’avons pas eu besoin de sponsor, de guide ou d’aide linguistique, il n’y avait que nous, et grâce a une bonne préparation et une attitude ouverte et positive, nous avons passé 14 mois extraordinaires.

Une de nos inquiétudes était de savoir comment on pourrait résoudre toute panne de moto, et ces pannes nous ont en fait donné de très bons souvenirs et nous ont permis de rencontrer les gens les plus intéressants.

Peu de choses nous ont manqué durant ce voyage, mais nos familles et amis en étaient la plus grande partie, heureusement, nous avons pu rester en contact avec eux et leur donner des nouvelles grâce au site Internet. Mais ce voyage nous a aussi permis de rendre visite à la famille de Carl en Australie, et nous avons vraiment apprécié leur accueil chaleureux.

Nous sommes à présent de retours en Europe et nous attendons nos motos qui devraient bientôt arriver de la Nouvelle-Zélande.

Il nous reste à dire un grand merci à tous ceux qui ont suivi notre voyage et mis des commentaires sur le site, cela nous a encouragé à continuer de le faire, et qui sait, nous en feront peut-être un autre.

Carl et Béné